Steve Wood, Boomi | Boomi World 2019

Steve Wood, Boomi | Boomi World 2019


>>Narrator: Live from Washington D.C. It’s theCUBE covering Boomi World 19. Brought to you by Boomi.>>Hey, welcome back to
theCUBE’s coverage of Boomi World 19, from Washington D.C. I’m Lisa Martin with John Furrier. And John and I have a Cube
alumni sitting with us. We have the chief product
officer of Dale Boomi, Steve Woods. Steve, welcome back.>>Yeah, thank you, it’s great to be back. Good to see you again, John.>>Great.
>>Nice to meet you, yeah.>>Likewise. Enjoyed your keynote this morning. Man, there were so many nuggets in there–>>Yeah.
>>I couldn’t type fast enough. But one of my favorite
things that you said, is that no one is asking
for less data slower.>>Yes, okay. I kind of say that ’cause it
frames things very clearly. ‘Cause it’s clearly a problem everybody relates to it in the audience. I thought it was kind of amusing. So, everybody got it immediately. I was like, yup, that’s a fair statement.>>And then you kind of
took us, the audience back to 11 months ago.
>>Yep.>>At Boomi World 18, some
of the things that you guys said, this is what we’re
going to be really focused on, redefining the I and I
has to be intelligent. Give our audience who wasn’t
able to see your keynote a little bit about
historical from 11 months ago to what you guys are
delivering today, what the Boomi platform looks like today.>>Yeah, yeah, sure. So, I
mean, a lot of what we showed last year, I mean, we kind of owe the, we feel like, we, as the kind of creators of the industry have to
kind of try to lead it, well, where is it going next? That’s our big, kind of duty, I guess. And so, it’s been taken over. We had the founder of Boomi
attend, which was nice. But yes, so, the big thing
we showed last year was kind of the next generation. Which is really a unified look and feel. So, it’s super easy to build
applications that spend all of the portfolio in our… That we offer our customers. We wanted to make it very collaborative. So, users of, over in the
business or business analyst or quick technical people
can work together and use our platform as a collaboration
space with the right controls in place. So, stuff like that. It was really good to show that. Our new solutions overview. We’ve been definitely
encouraging partners to put more intellectual property into our platform to help accelerate their customers, help accelerate our customers. Just get people on board to
this as quickly as possible. In fact, actually on boarding
and play on boarding was a solution we showed last year.>>That was fantastic.
>>Yeah.>>I couldn’t believe how
complex that was at Boomi and when you guys said,
“We’ve got to change this.”>>Yeah.
>>Huge improvements.>>Yeah, yeah, well, it was
sort of a discovery that came out from one of our sales
engineers, this guy Andy Tiller did a fantastic job. He didn’t enjoy his onboarding
experience at Boomi. (laughing) And then started building a
solution, and we were, like, whoa, like, we can
actually do this way better on the platform. But what was amazing was
that even for a company the size of Boomi, which is
about 1,000 people, we had like nearly 100 integration
points and systems that had to be coordinated
to onboard a single employee.>>100.
>>Yeah.>>Wow.
>>It’s a lot.>>Yeah, it is.
>>So, it became a real, like, connectivity problem. Actually, the onboarding
bit is relatively easy, it’s just like connecting
to all these systems is the hard bit. So, yeah, we were excited to
show that, I think everybody got a kick out of seeing it again. And then we give progress
on how we’re moving that forward with various demos.>>I want to ask you, last year
we asked the chief operating officer and the CEO of
Boomi, what their investment priorities were going into the next year. And they said number one was product.>>Yeah.
>>So, that was a key thing first and foremost. Go to market and then, you
know, customer equation. But our product has been a big focus here, continues to be. What does it mean, product? Like, when you’re chief product observer, what are you overseeing? Talk about what is the product? What is the platform? And is there a difference?>>Yeah, I mean, so, we
talk about the product, ’cause we’re in the product group. But we definitely see it as a platform. The investment and product is great. It means I get to spend lots of money. Like, I bought my new Converse. I won’t try to show them.>>They’re fabulous. Teal, by the way.>>But, yeah, I mean, the
investment part is being that we know that as we get more, as
this economy keeps building of integration and connectivity,
we want to continue to hold our leadership. We need to invest in
product to make it easier. The expectations of our users
is that they get a really premium experience when they’re onboard and onto the platform. We have to make sure we keep up to date with all of that effort. So, a lot of what we talk
about is how one, is that we break our product up into
discreet services to allow us to move faster from an engineering
perspective and there’s a lot of stuff that goes on there. To think about ourselves
as a platform, to make sure we’re fully extensible, and
then providing more and more services that people can
build on our platform. So, a lot that investment is
just driving those activities.>>And Rick was on yesterday
talking about the big bets they made early on that are
paying off, one of them was Aussie cloud–
>>Yeah.>>And seeing that. As you look at the architecture
of this kind of new era of cloud we’re in, Cloud
2.0, we’re calling it, this new requirement, it’s the
glue layers being built out, you need data to be
accessible and addressable and available in realtime–
>>Yeah.>>And have multiple
systems to talk to hence the integration you guys are doing. But this new mega trend is
happening, this event driven architecture, which you guys talk about.>>Yes.
>>There’s APIs just going from restful to state. And so, you have microservices here.>>Yeah.
>>So, these are new dynamics. Can you take a minute to
explain, like, what all this means and what is event
driven infrastructure?>>Yeah, event driven architecture.>>Architecture.
>>Yeah, that’s how, that’s what we’ve been calling it. Yeah, I mean, it’s basically
that we’re going to models where we’re responding in
realtime to some things that are happening out there. And that involves a
whole new level of scale. But, you know, we’re
also getting into things, like streaming. So, as data comes in, it’s
coming in, not in these packets, but it’s
constantly being fed to you. So, you’re constantly
having to process it. You know, before the
integration space, it was like, well you’d set up a schedule,
you’d say move that date at midnight from there to there. And then it got faster, and
Boomi provided realtime. Which is, like, request
response, like, you send it, we’re sending a response back. But now it’s, like, we’re not
just going to just send it to you as a discreet thing, we’re going
to send it to you constantly. So, event driven architecture
is about how do you handle this continuous influx of data. And it’s not getting any less. So, how do you kind of manage this? We’re being pulled at both ends. We’re being pulled… There’s never been more data that you never wanted to have faster. So, it’s, like, how do you manage that? So, for Boomi–
>>Yeah.>>You know, that’s why
we’re investing so heavily.>>It used to be in the old
days when things were slower events were like a trigger in
network management software.>>Yeah.
>>Alarm or notification. Now, they’re happening all the time. There’s more and more events.
>>Yes.>>And paying attention to what events becomes a nonhuman thing.>>Yes.
>>It’s a software thing. Is that kind of where this is going?>>Yeah, well, I mean, we’ve
been thinking a lot about that. Like, we sort of feel, like,
one is that we’re going to grow up from being an Ipas to more of a data management vendor. We think that we’re the
data management of the future will come from an Ipas. That we’ll be managing your
data across, like, all of these systems from the cataloging
and preparation to the, you know, to actually
integration and surfacing it up in realtime and all that
kind of streaming side. So, I don’t know, it’s a… Yeah, it’s an evolving field for sure.>>One final point on
this topic of product.>>Yeah.
>>APIs have been great.>>Yeah.
>>They really made the mark, going back to the original web services in early 2000s to cloud. Where does API go? API 2.0 or whatever we call it. What’s the next gen place for APIs?>>Well, so, it’s an interesting question. So, we have a slightly
different view of API management that maybe the typical
API management space. Which is one thing to declare openly. But I think I want to go with that we’re right in the sense that,
’cause I would think that ’cause I’m the product guy.>>It’s a good thing for
a product guy to think.>>Yeah.
>>So, go for it.>>We’re more than a little
opinionated, so, it’s–>>Let’s hear it.>>But yeah, sure, I
mean, with API you need a gateway, you need to fill
the proxy APIs, wherever they may be, wherever
they may be developed. Either you build ’em in Boomi
or you code them yourself. We need to be able to manage
those and throttle and scale and add policies, and, you
know, have developers registered to use them and monitor their usage. And cut them off. And have quotas, all that
kind of stuff, that is all fantastically good stuff. I mean, there’s lot of
understudy doing a lot of that. We’re adding more and
more capabilities there. But for us, API is really about API enabling absolutely everything. Like, we’re in this world
where you’ve got refrigerators to autonomous vehicles,
to cloud infrastructure, to pivotal. To all these different environments. And you have to have a
tool that, how do you manage API across this
incredibly desperate landscape of tools, technologies,
things, infrastructure?>>Yeah.
>>And there’s one thing to say, okay, we can manage APIs, and you install our software. Well, that’s not good enough. Because, you know, with a
customer like Jack in the Box, they have 2,200 plus retail locations. And that’s a joke to my
keynote, that it’s like painting Golden Gate Bridge. If you had to upgrade
your gateway every time there was an upgrade
needed, it’s like painting the Golden Gate Bridge, you
get to the end and your start all over again. That’s 2,200 plus retail locations. You know, I work for Dell
ultimately is the wholly owner of our business,
he put five billion PCs on the planet. What if you had a gateway
on five billion PCs? Like, how do you manage
that, from a single control plane in the cloud? And that’s what we’re after. How do you do that at a
huge scale, API enabling literally everything.>>And this was kind of under
the concept of run anywhere–>>It was.
>>That you were talking about this morning?
>>Yes, yes. Yeah. And that was because we wanted
to emphasize that it was about running APIs and API
enabling things wherever they may be. That’s why we put it under
the run any you are better.>>What’s the biggest thing
that you guys have done this year from last Boomi World
that you’re proud of in terms of product or technology or
something that can be obscure or something prominent. What are you proud of? What’s the big thing?>>Yeah, well, from a product
perspective it would be the API side for sure. Because that was a big lift. There was a lot of work involved. We kind of moved ourselves
forward very, very quickly in our capabilities in API
with gateway portal proxy. You know, literally within
the span of just over a year. So, that was a big lift. But I would, you know, cause
I also run engineering, so I feel like I need to like
geek pit a little bit. I mean, one of my proud
things is actually we started wrestling and wrangling
that 30 terabytes plus of metadata–
>>Yeah.>>And starting to see what’s in there. And like anything in data
science, you know, you’re kind of like looking
and going, we can start, we started seeing all
sorts of cool new things. Now, I’m not going to talk
about it, the inside side. But you start to see new things. We start to see ways that,
that metadata can be applied. So, we built the infrastructure. It’s a huge scale. A massive scale. The amount of metadata we’re ingesting and then analyzing is
helping us, you know, improve productivity across the platform. So, we talk a lot about
being more efficient and more effective. So, you’ll see more of
that in the platform.>>Can you clear up the
just the commentary around the definition around
singleton an instance and when customers do multitenan? Because the benefit of the
singleton is what the main core value proposition with
the data, the unification of the data, that’s awesome. But there’s also potentially
opportunities where customers might want… Have payroll run through things, so, there’s, you have flexibility. Is that true?>>Yes.>>Take us through the difference between when multitenan kicks in and what’s the–>>Well, so, in our
platform, multi tenancy is… So, if you think about the build expense, when you’re dragging, dropping,
putting, clicking, building your work flows, or your
processes for managing your data. You do that in the cloud. And then you can decide
where you want to put that. So, where is that actually be executed? And you can put it in our cloud. Which is our multi tenant cloud. And then we manage it all for you. And that’s fantastic. You can appoint to our
manage cloud services if you have very specific requirements. Usually, around security,
sometimes around hyper scale, w put you in a manage
cloud service environment. But then if you have very
sensitive data, you may want to run that work load and install
our little run time atom, you know, behind your firewall. So, we never see the data. So, if it’s supersensitive,
we don’t see it. We see how it’s running and we manage it, we upgrade that infrastructure for you. But we never see your data. So, it kind of gives you
the best of both worlds. You can be a cloud
first, cloud only vendor, and you can be a traditional
on-prem vendor or you can be hybrid of both.>>There’s not a
requirement of the product it’s a customer choice option?>>Steve: It’s a total customer choice.>>Okay, thanks.>>Yeah, and it’s pretty cool. Yeah, and I think actually we’re
one of the few that does it the way. we’ve been
doing it for a long time. And it’s hard, by the way. Because it’s, like maintaining that compatibility
for 10 plus years is quite difficult to make
sure that everything works every time, and we have like 9,000 plus–
>>9,000 plus customers in 80 plus countries?
>>Yeah.>>But on the 30 plus
terabytes of anonymized metadata, you were very
clear this morning in saying that it’s just the metadata,
it’s not the actual–>>Correct.
>>You don’t have any you know, private information from any of our customers. But in terms of leveraging
that data for those insights, what are some of the things
that from last Boomi World to this one that, that access
to all that data has… What are some of the
announcements maybe that came out today that you guys looked at saying, these are some of the nuggets
that we’re able to pull out because we had the access
to this using, maybe it’s AI or whatnot?>>Yeah, let me give you some examples. I mean, one was the suggested filters. And it was a simple thing I
did sort of make that joke, if it’s one small step for
Boomi customers but a giant leap for Boomi engineering. But it’s because we rebuilt a
whole bunch of infrastructure to do it. But suggestive filters just
make it easier to query information of various systems. And it is cool because it
literally is looking at your system, comparing it
with other customers systems based on how you’ve configured, in this case a telaio environment. And then working on actually
based on what people are doing this is kind of what
the filter might look like for you. Which is very, very
personalized to the user based on intelligence. So, we have more, that’s
on the build side. We have more on the deployment side. Because we can show you
actually hey if you built an API and you want it deployed out to a Raspberry Pi, well,
actually, you probably want to configure the API like this. Or, you may find you see some issues here. And that’s not static
information that’s evolving from the metadata. We can see the performance of your system. We can see actually, in
that environment I’d do it a bit like this. Or, if you deploy to
say Azure, we might make recommendations based on
that process or that API or that data quality that you want to access, make your systems run like this. So, it’s kind of
predicting how you deploy.>>I was just about to say,
are you helping customers get predictive with this?>>Yes. And there’s lots we can do there. I mean, like, so we’ll
do more and more of it. But we can automatically
optimize your deployment. So, if it’s in our cloud, that
all happens automatically. So, it helps us, too. But for customers it’s awesome. They can just go, okay, well deploy it. And then leverages the community to see what works best. The most successful deployment. The most successful
architecture in the way you’ve deployed it, is what
you’ll be matched with. And then the same with the
run time with monitoring. We can start to look at things
and say well, well, that’s slowing down a little bit. Actually, it’s slowing
down and starting to error a little bit. Actually, based on what we’ve
seen before, that system may be about to fall over. So, you might want to
get on that before it completely does what it’s going to do.>>While we got you
here, I want to get your definition of cloud 2.0. And
we’ve been riffing on this in more of a takeoff on web 2.0. Because cloud 1.0 was anything Amazon, you know, storage, compute.>>Uh-huh.>>Some networking, but
it’s Amazon networking. But you know, scale up,
start ups will go there. It’s a beautiful thing. But now as enterprise start
to embrace cloud with hybrid on-premises, and deal with
all these hard problems and challenges.
>>Yeah.>>It creates an opportunity
for an operating mall for on-premise and cloud.
>>Yeah.>>So, is cloud 1.0, Amazon
really easy to work with scales are beautiful. Cloud 2.0 is different.
>>Yes.>>We’ve got things to deal with. Observability is a hot thing. You got, you know, Cooper
Netty’s Containers.>>Yeah.>>How would you define what Cloud 2.0 is for enterprise?>>Well, I think because
we’re all about the data, Cloud 2.0 is really, like,
for us a data problem. I mean, it’s just, like,
you know, I think, before, I mean, I was part of the
sales force for a while. There was this whole idea
of, like, putting all your data in the cloud and we’ll
manage it all for you. But when you’re getting into
the kind of environments we’re seeing today,
there’s just too much data. It’s not feasible. I mean, to give you an
example, Boomi itself, we moved our infrastructure,
customers who transfer to customers from rock
space to NBUS last year. It was a big engineering lift
to do, you could imagine.>>Yeah.
>>Yeah.>>Moving 9,000 plus
customers over on our cloud design service there. So, we did that. But actually to move the
data, it was so much, it was actually faster
to put the disk drives on the back of a van–
>>Snowmobile.>>Move it over–
>>Snowball.>>Using the wheel network. You know, the engine motory one. And then put the hard
drives in and then we did our sync to bring them
back up so that we had the same data at both locations. And that’s just an example
of the kind of data that customers are
routinely struggling with. And the cloud wasn’t set up for that. But that’s becoming day to day now. So, you need a highly
distributed architecture. It was probably why we
announced the atom fabric. Which is really a fabric
of connectivity as much as it is a fabric of data. So, we don’t need to
move your data around. You can leave it where it is. We can do some analysis
on it as part of an end-to-end process.>>You had a Cube alumni
that was on theCUBE a couple weeks ago. He said, “Data is the new software.”>>Right.
>>”Data is software.”>>Yeah.
>>What’s your reaction to that when you hear that?>>To some extent I think that’s… As bit of a business process
geek, I think this, you know, this processor run data for sure. But I do think, like,
I’ve heard similar things. With, like, actually, you
know, applications come and go. Business processes come and go. But the data remains. So, I think maybe in some
respect that data is the new software could be a term I could buy into it probably. (laughing)>>Well, Steve, it’s been
great having you on theCUBE with John and me sharing
all of the things that you guys have done in the last 11 months. I can’t wait to see how
everything becomes API enabled until next Boomi World. So, you’ve got to come back.
>>Yeah, sounds great. Yeah, thank you very much.
>>All right, our pleasure. For John Furrier, I’m Lisa Martin. You’re watching theCUBE
from Boomi World 19. Thanks for watching. (upbeat music)

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